1840 Journal

Meet the artisans, discover their expertise, and share their passion.

Creators

Setting the pace with Rox Textile Art.

“I use fabric as a medium to create functional art,” explains Naila Janzen. As a matter of fact, her quilts, tote bags and cushions all serve a purpose and are handmade from natural fabrics that are locally-sourced from her hometown of Winnipeg. Working at her own pace, the artist has demonstrated persistence by investing her talent and creativity into the striking designs of Rox Textile Art. Here, an eclectic mix of shapes, lines, and colours catches the eye.

Geometry is perhaps the only template that guides Naila’s art. It's a preference that translates into her aesthetic and into her creative process. 

The forms are intriguing and their practical applications become a type of tangible mathematics, something that really appeals to Naila. “How do I make everything fit together so I end up with this result?” the designer asks herself. This question is what lies behind the combination of creativity and precision in her pieces: everything has to be perfectly calculated in order to complete creation process.

Naila’s passion for quilting was sparked by key moments in her life. The first time she tried quilting was after her husband had surgery. “I decided to quilt because I had some time off and I’ve always been interested in it,” she says. After putting time and effort into this project, she unfortunately had to start over from zero. “My quilt fell apart in the wash,” she recalls. While she was unsure that she would ever attempt it again, her passion for the art form returned when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. During her recovery, she spent a lot of time at home with little energy. “I was on the couch for a few months,” she says. “I was spending so much time at home, I needed to be productive.” She needed a long-term project that she could put away at any time. That’s when she took up sewing again and dove back into the time-intensive work of quilting.

As you can imagine, quilting is a lot of work. “It's very time consuming,” explains the designer.  “It will take anywhere between 30 to 40 hours from start to finish.” This imposed pace grounds the artist in the dynamic of slow fashion and slow made. Out of force of practice, Naila has established her own rhythm for making this textile art her own. “I don’t like patterns, except for my own,” she explains. “I prefer to express myself with my own designs.”

This is why we immediately feel drawn to Rox Textile Art's punchy pieces, and can truly appreciate the time that the artist has put into each one. 

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